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10 Tips For Nailing A Physical Therapy Job Interview

10 Tips For Nailing A Physical Therapy Job Interview

Samuel Awosolu | ArticleBase

4. What the question “tell me a little bit about you?” really means

The answer doesn’t start with “I like long walks on the beach and quiet evenings at home.” The interviewer is looking for personality traits and background information that establishes your qualifications for the position. Tell him or her about your work ethic, your love for the PT profession and your desire for ongoing education to stay current in the field.

5. What the question “tell me about your strengths and weaknesses?” really means

This isn’t the time to do a character assassination on yourself by telling the interviewer how hard it is for you to get up in the morning and that you and Chocolate Martinis are well acquainted. You probably will have no problem responding with 3-4 positive things about yourself, but how do you answer the weakness question? Mention a quality or two that is really a quasi-strength in disguise. For example, “I tend to spend more hours at work than most of my co-workers because I don’t feel comfortable going home until I have wrapped up all my paperwork for the day.”

6. What the question “what do you see yourself doing in 5 years?” really means

This is a probing question designed to determine how long you might stick around. While honesty is usually the best policy, there’s no law that says you have to work in the same place forever. If your goal is to attend college at night so you can switch careers and become a lawyer in 5 years, don’t bring it up. State goals that are in line with your PT career and that show you are a good candidate for long-term employment. Something like “I’d like to be your Senior Therapist,” is a good response.

7. Have specific examples of work successes ready

You can expect to be asked questions about your current position. Interviewers love to find out how you faced a particular challenge and to get insight into your day-to-day work experiences. Be ready with some specific examples of your more challenging cases. Also, provide some examples of how you were able to get a particular task accomplished under unusual pressure, or a short deadline, if you have those types of examples. Don’t make anything up though. It’s also a good idea to provide examples of your teamwork skills and how well you communicate ideas with co-workers and supervisors.


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