Print

Health Careers >> Browse Articles >> Travel Healthcare / Disaster Relief

+1

Make Travel Healthcare Workers Feel Welcome

Make Travel Healthcare Workers Feel Welcome

Megan Malugani, Monster Contributing Writer

Make Simple Gestures

It takes only a moment to introduce yourself to a traveler, but that simple gesture can mean a lot. Often, the unit staff ignores travelers, says RN Lori Northcutt, who has been a traveler for Cross Country TravCorps since 1994 and now works in New Hampshire. “Just saying, ‘Hi, I’m Sarah’ or ‘Welcome to the unit’ lets you know you’re welcomed there.”

How Considerate Are You?

1. During meetings, you:

Turn my cell phone off
Only answer important calls
All my calls are important

Once Northcutt received a welcome package from the hospital in North Carolina she was heading to next. “It included a homemade card that said ‘Welcome to the PICU’ and was signed by all the nurses,” Northcutt says. “It was just a simple thing, but that card really made me want to go there. I was excited before I even got there, and it did end up being a good place to work.”

Be a Resource

Travelers generally aren’t shy about asking questions — from locating supplies to finding the best local restaurants or tourist attractions. Your cheerful responsiveness can play a significant role in the traveler’s experience. Northcutt is still grateful to a staff nurse at one of her assignments for telling her about a shortcut that shaved five miles off her commute.

“Regular staff can be a great resource for us,” Northcutt says. “They’re usually proud of their area and will gladly answer questions.”

Find out more about Travel Healthcare!

This article originally appeared on Monster Career Advice.


AllHealthcare School Finder

Save time in your search for a degree program. Use AllHealthcare's School Finder to locate schools online and in your area.


* In the event that we cannot find a program from one of our partner schools that matches your specific area of interest, we may show schools with similar or unrelated programs.